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Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Free Community Forum September 9th

Free Community Forum
What is the situation in Virginia? What are the prevention efforts? Join us in an evening dedicated to education and sharing!
• Learn from our diverse group of panelists!
• Question and Answer session!

When: Thursday, Sept 9th 2010 6pm - 8pm

Where: VCU Student Commons, Virginia Room C & D

Cost: FREE

Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Suicide among Older Adults

Presenters: Chris Miara, M.S., Director of Training and Administration, SPRC
Rosalyn Blogier, LCSW-C, Public Health Advisor, SAMHSA
Yeates Conwell, M.D., Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester
When: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 3:00 PM-4:30 PM Eastern Time

Brief description: Older adults die by suicide at a higher rate than the national average. Every year, more than 5,000 Americans over the age of 65 die by suicide, a death toll that is largely preventable. Elderly white men have the highest rate of suicide of all demographic groups in the U.S. Although suicide rates of older Americans have been slowly declining for many years, older men and women of every race continue to die by suicide, and the need for prevention is urgent. This webinar reviews the research associated with suicide among older adults, including risk and protective factors and effective suicide prevention strategies. In addition, this webinar will specifically address the issue of suicide risk and prevention in the context of community programs and residential facilities.
Objectives:
Participants will be able to:
1. Describe the scope of the problem, including risk and protective factors related to suicide among older adults
2. Summarize research findings regarding effective suicide prevention strategies for this population.
3. Report the key findings from focus groups and interviews with senior living center staff regarding their knowledge, attitudes and practices related to mental health promotion and suicide prevention.
4. Access a new toolkit funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration titled "Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Suicide in Senior Living Communities.”

Additional resources to be referenced during the webinar:
Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for Senior Living Communities
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/SMA10-4515

Register online
Space is limited. Please register at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/212444497
After you register, you will receive an e-mail containing information about how to participate in the webinar via the phone and internet. If you have any questions about your registration, please contact Tiffany Kim, SPRC Project Coordinator at 202-572-3717 or tkim@edc.org.

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

RRSR in Abingdon

Most mental health clinicians have had little or no formal training in assessing suicide risk, yet they are often called upon to do so. Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Mental Health Clinicians (RRSR) has been developed by the American Association of Suicidology specifically to fill this training gap. RRSR is an advanced, interactive training based on established core competencies that mental health professionals need in order to effectively assess and manage suicide risk in their patients. The program has several components, including a web-based assessment; two on-line, self-paced modules; a two-day face-to-face workshop; and post-workshop mentorship through on-line learning activities.
RRSR is appropriate for any mental health clinician. Participants typically include licensed private counselors, licensed clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses, addictions counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists and pastoral counselors.
Additional information is available at Suicide Prevention Training For Mental Health Clinicians in Abingdon, VA Added to 2010 Schedule
Most mental health clinicians have had little or no formal training in assessing suicide risk, yet they are often called upon to do so. Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Mental Health Clinicians (RRSR) has been developed by the American Association of Suicidology specifically to fill this training gap. RRSR is an advanced, interactive training based on established core competencies that mental health professionals need in order to effectively assess and manage suicide risk in their patients. The program has several components, including a web-based assessment; two on-line, self-paced modules; a two-day face-to-face workshop; and post-workshop mentorship through on-line learning activities.
RRSR is appropriate for any mental health clinician. Participants typically include licensed private counselors, licensed clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses, addictions counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists and pastoral counselors.
Additional information is available at http://www.suicidology.org/web/guest/education-and-training/rrsr
When: August 2 & 3, 2010
Where: Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center, Abingdon, Virginia
Cost: This training is provided free of charge. Lunch will be on your own both days.

Registration: Please visit http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/RRSRAbingdon to register.
Seating is limited to 50 people per training. Because of the demand for seats, please register only if you are able to attend the full two days, and are not 'on-call' for other duties during that time.
Please feel free to contact me with any questions; christina.benton@vdh.virginia.gov or 804-864-7736.

Friday, May 28, 2010

2008 Injury in Virginia Report

Injuries are a leading public health problem in Virginia. In 2008, there were 3,929 injury related deaths and 42,748 injury related hospitalizations. Attached to this email you will find the Injury in Virginia, 2008 report; which provides an overview of injury deaths and hospitalizations in Virginia. A new edition was made to the report this year; a section evaluating injury death and hospitalization by insurance status and community poverty.

I also want to remind you that for more information either on injury data in your area or for other areas in Virginia you may visit VOIRS, the Virginia Online Injury Reporting System at http://www.vahealth.org/CIVP/VOIRS. This system contains data from 1999-2008 and allows you to create customized injury data reports on various mechanisms (causes) and intents of injury by geographic and demographic variables.
For more injury related reports and data please visit the Virginia Department of Health, Division of Injury and Violence Prevention’s webpage at http://www.vahealth.org/Injury/Data.

If you have any questions, need additional data, or would like me to provide a presentation on injuries to you or to groups within your community please contact me by phone at 804-864-7745 or by email at stephanie.goodman@vdh.virginia.gov.

Stories that Heal

Stories That Heal (A National Mental Health Campaign for the African American Community)

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), working in collaboration with the Ad Council and the Stay Strong Foundation, announced today the launch of a national public service advertising (PSA) campaign designed to raise awareness of mental health problems among young adults in the African American community.

Mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, are widespread in the U.S. and often misunderstood. According to SAMHSA, in 2008 there were an estimated 9.8 million adults aged 18 or older living with serious mental illness. Among adults, the prevalence of serious mental illness is highest in the 18 to 25 age group, yet this age group is also the least likely to receive services or counseling. In 2008, 6.0 percent of African Americans ages 18-25 had serious mental illness in the past year. Overall, only 58.7 percent of Americans with serious mental illness received care within the past 12 months and the percentage of African Americans receiving services is only 44.8 percent.
Created pro bono by Grey New York through the Ad Council, the campaign aims to promote acceptance of mental health problems within the African American community by encouraging, educating and inspiring young adults to step up and talk openly about mental health problems. The television, radio, print and Web ads feature real personal stories of African Americans dealing with mental health problems, and they aim to engage those in the community to support young adults who need help. The PSAs direct audiences to visit a new website, www.storiesthatheal.samhsa.gov, where they can learn more about mental health problems and how to get involved.

What a Difference a Friend Makes

What a Difference a Friend Makes (A National Campaign for Young Adults With Mental Health Issues)
According to a national survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) there are an estimated 9.8 million adults aged 18 or older living with serious mental illness. Among adults, the prevalence of serious mental illness is highest in the 18 to 25 age group, yet this age group is also the least likely to receive services or counseling for mental health issues.
To help address this problem and as part of Mental Health Awareness Month, SAMHSA and The Advertising Council have launched a series of national public service announcements (PSAs) designed to encourage, educate and inspire young adults (18-25 years old) to step up and support friends and family they know are experiencing a mental health problem.
Created by the advertising agency Grey New York, through the Ad Council, the campaign aims to promote acceptance of mental health problems by encouraging, educating and inspiring young adults to step up and talk openly about mental health problems. The new television and Web PSAs encourage young adults to step up and help a friend through recovery. The PSAs direct audiences to visit the campaign website, www.whatadifference.samhsa.gov, where they can participate in a new discussion forum, find tools to help in the recovery process, learn about the different types of mental illnesses, read real-life stories about support and recovery, and to see how friends can make all the difference. The PSAs will air in advertising time that will be entirely donated by the media. In an effort to further the reach of the campaign online, a social media program will also kick off this week.

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

SUICIDE PREVENTION TRAINING FOR CAMPUS MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIANS

Eight Slots are available for May 24-25th....

Most mental health clinicians have had little or no formal training in assessing suicide risk, yet they are often called upon to do so. Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Clinicians (RRSR) has been developed by the American Association of Suicidology specifically to fill this training gap. RRSR is an advanced, interactive training based on established core competencies that mental health professionals need in order to effectively assess and manage suicide risk. The program has several components, including a web-based assessment; two on-line, self-paced modules; a two-day face-to-face workshop; and post-workshop mentorship through on-line learning activities.

RRSR is appropriate for any mental health clinician. Participants typically come from both campus and community settings and include licensed private counselors, licensed clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses, addictions counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists and pastoral counselors.

RRSR is a complement to the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) program. ASIST is suicide prevention “first aid”; for ‘frontline’ helpers who will be referring a person at risk on to the next level of care. RRSR is for the clinicians who receive those referrals, make decisions about emergency care and provide longer term treatment.

Additional information is available at Most mental health clinicians have had little or no formal training in assessing suicide risk, yet they are often called upon to do so. Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Clinicians (RRSR) has been developed by the American Association of Suicidology specifically to fill this training gap. RRSR is an advanced, interactive training based on established core competencies that mental health professionals need in order to effectively assess and manage suicide risk. The program has several components, including a web-based assessment; two on-line, self-paced modules; a two-day face-to-face workshop; and post-workshop mentorship through on-line learning activities.

RRSR is appropriate for any mental health clinician. Participants typically come from both campus and community settings and include licensed private counselors, licensed clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses, addictions counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists and pastoral counselors.

RRSR is a complement to the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) program. ASIST is suicide prevention “first aid”; for ‘frontline’ helpers who will be referring a person at risk on to the next level of care. RRSR is for the clinicians who receive those referrals, make decisions about emergency care and provide longer term treatment.

Additional information is available at Most mental health clinicians have had little or no formal training in assessing suicide risk, yet they are often called upon to do so. Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Clinicians (RRSR) has been developed by the American Association of Suicidology specifically to fill this training gap. RRSR is an advanced, interactive training based on established core competencies that mental health professionals need in order to effectively assess and manage suicide risk. The program has several components, including a web-based assessment; two on-line, self-paced modules; a two-day face-to-face workshop; and post-workshop mentorship through on-line learning activities.

RRSR is appropriate for any mental health clinician. Participants typically come from both campus and community settings and include licensed private counselors, licensed clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses, addictions counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists and pastoral counselors.

RRSR is a complement to the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) program. ASIST is suicide prevention “first aid”; for ‘frontline’ helpers who will be referring a person at risk on to the next level of care. RRSR is for the clinicians who receive those referrals, make decisions about emergency care and provide longer term treatment.

Additional information is available at http://www.suicidology.org/web/guest/education-and-training/rrsr

The Campus Suicide Prevention Center of Virginia, in partnership with the Virginia Department of health, will host 3 RRSR trainings in 2010. Thanks to a generous grant from the Division of Injury and Violence Prevention of the Virginia Department of Health, there is no cost to participants. The RRSR training is typically valued at $250.

Our trainer will be Dr. Adrienne Barna, licensed clinical psychologist and the Associate Director of Counseling and Psychological Service at George Mason University. Dr. Barna coordinates clinical and emergency services and specializes in providing training to campus based counseling center staff. Dr. Barna has been affiliated with Mason for over 24 years.

Please note; these trainings are open only to those working in professional mental health/clinician role.

2010 Training Dates/Locations:
May 24-25, Augusta Health (formerly Augusta Medical Center), Fishersville, VA
Sept. 23-24, Thomas Nelson Community College, Hampton VA

The Campus Suicide Prevention Center of Virginia, in partnership with the Virginia Department of health, will host 3 RRSR trainings in 2010. Thanks to a generous grant from the Division of Injury and Violence Prevention of the Virginia Department of Health, there is no cost to participants. The RRSR training is typically valued at $250.

For more information or to Register Contact: Jane Wiggins at wigginjr@jmr.edu or go to http://www.campussuicidepreventionva.org

Monday, January 4, 2010

Virginia's Wounded Warrior Conference

SAVE THE DATE!
The Virginia Wounded Warrior Program is hosting Virginia is for Heroes 2010 in Richmond, Virginia on February 18th. The conference will address the support needed for veterans and their family members experiencing the effects of combat stress and traumatic brain injury.
On-line registration for the conference will begin on January 8, 2010. Please see the attached flyer and the Virginia Department of Veterans Services website (www.VirginiaforVeterans.com) for more information.
...from C. Sloan, SPM, Virginia Department of Health

Voices of Hope and Recovery

The Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Behavioral Services recently premiered a new film, “Voices of Hope and Recovery,” that documents the struggles and victories of five Virginians who have overcome mental illness to live life in their own communities. Created by award-winning Virginia filmmaker Robert Griffith, along with an original score by acclaimed Virginia singer/songwriter Steve Bassett, this film illustrates the power of hope and the possibility of recovery from serious mental illness. Though taking place in Virginia, these stories of hope and recovery could be happening anywhere in the country or the world. The five brave individuals featured in this film speak for millions of others who are on similar paths.
The film is now available online, found here: http://www.vimeo.com/8248404. Please feel free to pass this link on to any interested parties. (Please note if you have difficulty playing the film, you may fix the problem by downloading the latest version of Adobe Flash Player.)
Below is an AP story on the film premiere.
...from C. Sloan, Suicide Prevention Manager, Virginia Department of Health